Fun with Phrasal Verbs: Phrasal Verbs with Hold

Posted on Posted in American English Grammar and Usage, Business English, English lessons in New York, ESL tips, New York Culture, Online English lessons, Phrasal Verbs, Tutoring

The verb “hold” in English is a commonly used irregular verb. If you are unsure of the meaning, you can check out the definitions here. Below is a chart showing how the conjugation:

Present tense: I/They/You/We hold  He/She/It holds

Past tense: held

Past participle: held

Here are a few examples of “hold” in sentences:

The happy couple walked down the street holding hands.

Before the accident, he was driving carelessly, with one hand holding the steering wheel, while the other held his phone.

The cat likes to be petted, but he doesn’t like to be held. (passive voice example)

When you hold the baby, make sure to support his head.

We also use “hold” in another less literal sense where it is similar to “keep.”  In traditional wedding vows, the bride and groom each repeat the phrases: “to have and to hold from this day forward.”

Hold is often used when speaking on the phone.  We put people “on hold” while we talk to someone else on a different phone line. Example:  “I have another call coming in. I have to take it. Can I put you on hold for a minute?”

Sometimes if you are expecting a call from someone important, an assistant will call you first and ask if you can “hold” for the person. The assistant is asking you to wait patiently for the person to come to the phone. 

There are several phrasal verbs used with hold.  Today we’ll examine: hold on, hold up, hold off, hold out, hold back, hold in and hold overFor the native speaker, there are clear distinctions, but it might be hard to grasp the differences for non-native speakers.

(Quick review:  A phrasal verb is a verb with an added element — usually a preposition or adverb — which changes or modifies the meaning of that verb.)

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5 Easy Labor Day Weekend New York Getaway Day Trips

Posted on Posted in American Culture and Holidays, English lessons in New York, New York Culture, Tutoring

 

Most of my students are newcomers to New York. Some already understand that New Yorkers love to get away from the city, especially on long weekends during the summer, but if you didn’t make plans, it’s not too late to have a fun three-day weekend. There a lots of interesting places to explore within the five boroughs of New York City, and there are plenty of easy day trips outside of the city that don’t require finding a “last minute”  car rental.

Here are five ideas for outdoor excersions that will feel like mini-vacations.

  1. Explore Manhattan’s Northern Tip

You can start by catching the A train to 207th Street. From there you can visit Fort Tryon Park. The park offers beautiful Hudson River views on winding paths. This is also where you can find visit The Cloisters. You can then walk to Inwood Hill Park, which offers hiking trails with old growth trees. There is also a Nature Center there where you can learn more about the local ecology. Sometimes there are additional activities sponsored by the Parks Department, such as kayaking. (more…)

Welcome to the Perfect English NYC Blog

Posted on Posted in American Culture and Holidays, English lessons in New York, ESL tips, New York Culture, Tutoring

This is the blog of the Perfect English NYC website. If you are looking for private 1:1 ESL/English lessons/tutoring, please go to the HOME page to get started. If you are looking for FREE resources to help you learn English, please check out the links to your right. Posts below may contain short lessons, ideas for self-study, and/or stories about American culture, holidays, traditions, etc — and especially about life in New York City for newcomers!